pzl-pcs.gif (2364 bytes)An Internet Glossary

Below is a list of terms you may run across while surfing the World Wide Web. Clicking on any of these terms will bring you to its definition. You can either click on "back" after the definition or use your browser’s back button to bring you back to the term list. When you are finished, use the menu to your left to continue your navigation through TeachersFirst.


Terms

(note: clicking BACK after any term will bring you back to the complete list of terms.)

Address * Attachment * Backbone * Bookmark

Browser * Cache * CGI * Cookie

Dialer * DNS * Domain * E-mail * Explorer

Frame * FTP * GIF * Gopher * Header

History * HTML * Hub * ISP

Java * Javascript * JPEG (JPG)

Kilobytes (KB) and Megabytes (MB) * Link

Modem * MPEG (MPG) * Newsgroups

Navigator * Search Engine * Server

Spam * SSL * Telnet * URL

Click here to simply scroll though the list yourself.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Address

An address is a unique number or group of characters that identifies a unique user or location on the Internet. People can be identified by their e-mail addresses, and each work station on a network has its own IP address. (An IP address is a group of four numbers, each under 256, that identify a particular computer.) BACK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attachment

A file – picture, document, or any other format – which is included with an e-mail message. Once the message is delivered, the attached file can be saved to the recipient’s computer and be viewed or edited. BACK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Backbone

Very high capacity lines which handle traffic between major points on the Internet. These backbone connections are operated by several different companies and provide enough redundancy so that a failure of one segment will not cause the entire network to fail. BACK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bookmark

A way of saving a URL in your browser for a site to which you want to return later. Instead of searching for the site again or manually entering it, you can simply click on the bookmark to return to the URL. To add a new bookmark:

In Netscape: Click on "Bookmarks" and select "Add Bookmark."

In Internet Explorer: Click on "Favorites" and select "Add to Favorites."

Then, at any time, if you wish to return to the site you have bookmarked, simply select the name of the site from your Bookmark (or Favorites) menu. BACK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Browser

A software program used to view files on the World Wide Web. Browsers can retrieve, save, mark, and navigate through HTML pages posted anywhere on the net. Many browsers can also incorporate small special-purpose programs, called plug-ins, which will play music or sounds, display video, or perform other special functions. BACK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cache

A special set of files which a browser creates as the user views pages on the Internet. When the browser encounters a file on the net that is the same as one in the local cache, the browser will use the cached file, since it will load more quickly from the local hard disk than it would from the network. BACK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CGI

Acronym for Common Gateway Interface, a programming language used in interactive web pages. CGI is often used in search engines, and other pages that display information specific to one individual user. BACK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cookie

A "cookie" is a piece of information from a specific web site that is stored on your computer. Examples include the last date you visited a site, or what links you followed when you were there. BACK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dialer

A small program which the computer uses to dial a previously-entered phone number to connect with an Internet service provider. Some dialers can be programmed with numbers for several different Internet services. BACK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DNS

Acronym for Domain Name Server. Domain Name Servers take normal Internet addresses and convert them to four-part IP addresses. I.e. http://www.hotmail.com is translated to http://207.82.250.251 so that your computer can locate the other computer on the network. BACK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Domain

A name given to a specific site. For example, TeachersFirst resides at www.teachersfirst.com. Technically, the domain is teachersfirst.com, while the "www" in front indicates that you are accessing a document from teachersfirst.com’s web server. BACK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

E-mail

Electronic mail – messages sent over the Internet from one user to another. BACK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Explorer

Trade name for Microsoft’s Internet browser. BACK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Frame

Web pages can be subdivided into several frames, each of which behaves independently. For example, this frame contains this definition page, and the left frame is the menu frame. It’s like having two (or more) browsers in one. BACK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FTP

Acronym for File Transfer Protocol, a way of transferring files between two computers via the Internet. BACK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GIF

Acronym for Graphics Interchange Format, a computer graphics file format which will display on a number of different computer platforms. BACK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gopher

A method of searching information stored on remote computers. This technology has grown less popular in recent years, as Web-based search engines are able to present information in a much more refined and customizable format. BACK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Header

The information stored at the beginning of a packet of data sent over the Internet. The header includes the information on each packet’s destination, so that each packet will arrive at the proper location. BACK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

History

A list of Web sites that you have visited in recent times, usually the past month. Most browsers allow you to view your history, so that you can return to sites whose names you cannot remember. The history is also responsible for differently-colored links. Links which have already been followed will be colored differently than links to places you have never visited. BACK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HTML

Acronym for Hypertext Markup Language, the code in which web pages are written. BACK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hub

A hardware component which connects several computers on a network. BACK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ISP

Acronym for Internet Service Provider, companies who sell access to the Internet. This includes companies like America Online, who have their own content in addition to providing Internet access, and companies like AT&T’s Worldnet, who merely maintain direct connections to the Internet. BACK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Java

A programming language written specifically for use on the Internet. Developed by Sun, it is designed to allow Internet users to run small programs through their browser. Java will run only on 32-bit operating systems (i.e. NOT in Windows 3.1) BACK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Javascript

A condensed form of Java, with lesser capabilities. Considered to be less of a security risk. BACK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

JPEG (JPG)

Acronym for Joint Photographic Experts Group. An image file format which gained much popularity after CompuServe, patent holder of the GIF format, threatened to start charging royalties for its use. JPEGs are also able to store the same picture in a smaller space. BACK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kilobytes (KB) and Megabytes (MB)

A Kilobyte (KB) is 1,024 bytes, or characters. A Megabyte (MB) is 1,024 Kilobytes. In practical use, however, both are thought as multiples of thousands. BACK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Link

A piece of highlighted text, much like the BACK at the end of this definition, that will take your browser to another location when you click on it. BACK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Modem

Acronym, of sorts, for Modulator-Demodulator. A modem takes the digital signals generated by computers and converts them into analog signals so that they can be sent over voice telephone lines. BACK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MPEG (MPG)

Acronym for Motion Picture Experts Group. A manner of storing compressed movies and video clips. BACK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Newsgroups

Areas of the internet where discussion about every topic imaginable takes place. Examples of newsgroup names are: rec.humor and alt.music.led-zeppelin. BACK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Navigator

Trade name for Netscape’s Internet browser. BACK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Search Engine

A search engine is a web site where the contents of millions of other web sites have been recorded. This archive is searchable, and sometimes may even be browsed by topic. Leading search engines include Yahoo!, HotBot, and AltaVista. BACK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Server

A computer that is hooked up to the Internet that sends information to users. For example, your computer received this document from TeachersFirst’s web server. BACK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spam

Unsolicited mass emailings, usually advertisements or fraudulent get-rich-quick schemes. BACK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SSL

A new type of data encryption that makes online shopping (and, in fact, anything confidential or personal) much safer than it used to be. BACK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Telnet

Another method of connecting to a host computer. Telnet is seeing much less use in the era of the World-Wide Web. BACK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

URL

Acronym for Unique Resource Locator, a means of providing a unique location name for a page or other file on the Internet. Internet sites are commonly identified by the URL for their main or "home" page. BACK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Full Listing of Internet Terms


Address

An address is a unique number or group of characters that identifies a unique user or location on the Internet. People can be identified by their e-mail addresses, and each work station on a network has its own IP address. (An IP address is a group of four numbers, each under 256, that identify a particular computer.)

 

Attachment

A file – picture, document, or any other format – which is included with an e-mail message. Once the message is delivered, the attached file can be saved to the recipient’s computer and be viewed or edited.

 

Backbone

Very high capacity lines which handle traffic between major points on the Internet. These backbone connections are operated by several different companies and provide enough redundancy so that a failure of one segment will not cause the entire network to fail.

 

Bookmark

A way of saving a URL in your browser for a site to which you want to return later. Instead of searching for the site again or manually entering it, you can simply click on the bookmark to return to the URL. To add a new bookmark:

In Netscape: Click on "Bookmarks" and select "Add Bookmark."

In Internet Explorer: Click on "Favorites" and select "Add to Favorites."

Then, at any time, if you wish to return to the site you have bookmarked, simply select the name of the site from your Bookmark (or Favorites) menu.

 

Browser

A software program used to view files on the World Wide Web. Browsers can retrieve, save, mark, and navigate through HTML pages posted anywhere on the net. Many browsers can also incorporate small special-purpose programs, called plug-ins, which will play music or sounds, display video, or perform other special functions.

 

Cache

A special set of files which a browser creates as the user views pages on the Internet. When the browser encounters a file on the net that is the same as one in the local cache, the browser will use the cached file, since it will load more quickly from the local hard disk than it would from the network.

 

CGI

Acronym for Common Gateway Interface, a programming language used in interactive web pages. CGI is often used in search engines, and other pages that display information specific to one individual user.

 

Cookie

A "cookie" is a piece of information from a specific web site that is stored on your computer. Examples include the last date you visited a site, or what links you followed when you were there.

 

Dialer

A small program which the computer uses to dial a previously-entered phone number to connect with an Internet service provider. Some dialers can be programmed with numbers for several different Internet services. 

 

DNS

Acronym for Domain Name Server. Domain Name Servers take normal Internet addresses and convert them to four-part IP addresses. I.e. http://www.hotmail.com is translated to http://207.82.250.251 so that your computer can locate the other computer on the network.

 

Domain

A name given to a specific site. For example, TeachersFirst resides at www.teachersfirst.com. Technically, the domain is teachersfirst.com, while the "www" in front indicates that you are accessing a document from teachersfirst.com’s web server.

 

E-mail

Electronic mail – messages sent over the Internet from one user to another.

 

Explorer

Trade name for Microsoft’s Internet browser.

 

Frame

Web pages can be subdivided into several frames, each of which behaves independently. For example, this frame contains this definition page, and the left frame is the menu frame. It’s like having two (or more) browsers in one.

 

FTP

Acronym for File Transfer Protocol, a way of transferring files between two computers via the Internet.

 

GIF

Acronym for Graphics Interchange Format, a computer graphics file format which will display on a number of different computer platforms.

 

Gopher

A method of searching information stored on remote computers. This technology has grown less popular in recent years, as Web-based search engines are able to present information in a much more refined and customizable format.

 

Header

The information stored at the beginning of a packet of data sent over the Internet. The header includes the information on each packet’s destination, so that each packet will arrive at the proper location.

 

History

A list of Web sites that you have visited in recent times, usually the past month. Most browsers allow you to view your history, so that you can return to sites whose names you cannot remember. The history is also responsible for differently-colored links. Links which have already been followed will be colored differently than links to places you have never visited.

 

HTML

Acronym for Hypertext Markup Language, the code in which web pages are written.

 

Hub

A hardware component which connects several computers on a network.

 

ISP

Acronym for Internet Service Provider, companies who sell access to the Internet. This includes companies like America Online, who have their own content in addition to providing Internet access, and companies like AT&T’s Worldnet, who merely maintain direct connections to the Internet.

 

Java

A programming language written specifically for use on the Internet. Developed by Sun, it is designed to allow Internet users to run small programs through their browser. Java will run only on 32-bit operating systems (i.e. NOT in Windows 3.1)

 

Javascript

A condensed form of Java, with lesser capabilities. Considered to be less of a security risk.

 

JPEG (JPG)

Acronym for Joint Photographic Experts Group. An image file format which gained much popularity after CompuServe, patent holder of the GIF format, threatened to start charging royalties for its use. JPEGs are also able to store the same picture in a smaller space.

 

Kilobytes (KB) and Megabytes (MB)

A Kilobyte (KB) is 1,024 bytes, or characters. A Megabyte (MB) is 1,024 Kilobytes. In practical use, however, both are thought as multiples of thousands.

 

Link

A piece of highlighted text, much like the BACK at the end of this definition, that will take your browser to another location when you click on it.

 

Modem

Acronym, of sorts, for Modulator-Demodulator. A modem takes the digital signals generated by computers and converts them into analog signals so that they can be sent over voice telephone lines.

 

MPEG (MPG)

Acronym for Motion Picture Experts Group. A manner of storing compressed movies and video clips.

 

Newsgroups

Areas of the internet where discussion about every topic imaginable takes place. Examples of newsgroup names are: rec.humor and alt.music.led-zeppelin.

 

Navigator

Trade name for Netscape’s Internet browser.

 

Search Engine

A search engine is a web site where the contents of millions of other web sites have been recorded. This archive is searchable, and sometimes may even be browsed by topic. Leading search engines include Yahoo!, HotBot, and AltaVista.

 

Server

A computer that is hooked up to the Internet that sends information to users. For example, your computer received this document from TeachersFirst’s web server.

 

Spam

Unsolicited mass emailings, usually advertisements or fraudulent get-rich-quick schemes.

 

SSL

A new type of data encryption that makes online shopping (and, in fact, anything confidential or personal) much safer than it used to be.

 

Telnet

Another method of connecting to a host computer. Telnet is seeing much less use in the era of the World-Wide Web.

 

URL

Acronym for Unique Resource Locator, a means of providing a unique location name for a page or other file on the Internet. Internet sites are commonly identified by the URL for their main or "home" page.

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